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Marketing for Printers – Review Response

My recent post, in this marketing for printers series, is insightful on how to get reviews and manage them, read the post here: https://heritageprinting.com/blog/marketing-for-print-customer-reviews/. This post follows it with further information on how to respond to your online reviews.

As the world turns, so does Google and its algorithm of measuring (which directly impacts all of us). It was no surprise when the big G recently began sending responses to reviews back to the reviewer. For now, when you say thank you or make any comment to a review posted on your Google My Business listing, Google emails your comment to your customer.

Why is this important? I believe that it is, because it sends a message that you care about your customer. The big trend G has pushed is E.A.T. expertise, authoritativeness, trust. By responding, you indicate a measure of E.A.T. about your product, service and customers.

EAT IMAGE

How to respond to reviews

Timing is important, so monitor your review activity and respond within 36 hours when possible, weekends and holidays excluded of course. A timely reply indicates you are aware of your client and tells Google that too. My average response time, during business hours, is 1 hour or less, after hours is 12 to 14 hours or less. My goal is to respond as quick as possible, I want to stay in front of our customer as long as possible, especially in a positive environment.

Responding to Reviews

Responding to Reviews

The tone of your response is critical. I try to stay positive, with a short comment declaring our appreciation for their business. I never advise a confrontational comment. Engaging in a dramatic, online argument never provides any benefit for your business.

Responding to Reviews

Responding to Reviews

Mention the reviewer by name in your reply. Everyone likes to hear their name in a positive manner, whether it be in person or online. Personalization has been a staple for print marketing, we call it variable data!

Be original, write a unique reply every time. Copy/Paste the same reply multiple times will be seen by Google, reviewers and potential customers, it diminishes the value of the message when you repeatedly send the same response.

4 Star reviews are not a bad thing, some individuals believe perfection is impossible, therefore their absolute best review will be a 4 star. I address these reviewers with a polite email asking what we could have done better to receive the additional star. If the customer is responding, we try to incorporate their suggestion, then I’ll email them back, asking if it’s possible to have the review improved to a 5 star.

I never ask twice, too many attempts to rectify only irritates, so once is enough. If your interaction with this individual is less than perfect, then let it go, he/she will not change their mind and you can only damage the relationship.

Responding to Reviews

Responding to Reviews

Google has made review replies more interactive, I’m embracing this change and modifying our review system, I believe this is a true benefit, let’s take advantage of it.

Kevin Smith
Marketing Manager
Heritage Printing

Independence Day

Happy Independence Day

Happy Independence Day

Commonly known as Independence Day, July 4th has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1941. However, the tradition of Independence Day celebrations goes back to the 18th century and the American Revolution (1775-83). In June 1776, representatives of the 13 colonies fighting in the revolutionary struggle weighed a resolution that would declare their independence from Great Britain. On July 2nd, the Continental Congress voted in favor of independence, and two days later its delegates adopted the Declaration of Independence, a historic document drafted by Thomas Jefferson. Since 1776, July 4th has been celebrated as the birth of American independence, with typical festivities ranging from fireworks, parades and concerts to more casual family gatherings and barbecues.

Source: www.history.com/

 

Marketing for Print – Quality Control

My second installment in the Marketing for Print series, today we discuss quality control, the effects it has on marketing and how to improve it.

What exactly is quality control?

Your products and services are measured by your customers, how they perceive you through customer service, the products, delivery and follow up. Quality control is managing people and products to provide a better than expected experience.

How does QC affect my marketing?

Marketing is the positive (or negative) positing of a company, its brand, products and services to a targeted audience. Good quality control will enhance your marketing efforts with positive reviews, content for blogs and newsletters. A good experience can lead to referrals. Bad quality control can be any or all these aspects: poor customer service can erode any aspect of product or logistics; a bad experience begins with poor service. Products that do not meet expectations disappoint customers, if they are on a tight timeframe, they become frustrated. Bad logistics are difficult to manage, but packaging properly can often protect your product from the poor handling efforts of most major logistics providers. Bad QC can lead to negative reviews on Google, Social Media and “word of mouth” from your customer.

What is a reasonable expectation of quality control success?

Exceptional quality is a moving target, especially in our world of print. Reasonable levels could be in a range of 3% to 5% in some markets, this can vary according to size of company and the number of customers served. Measure your quality issues against your production numbers to form a quality level to strive for.

What can I do, from a marketing aspect, to affect the quality of products and services?

Get familiar with your products, ask a lot of questions while your products are in production, knowledge is power. When you witness a “less than positive” product in production, bring it to the attention of the supervisor. Get to know your coworkers, friends will speak freely to friends, earning the trust from your coworker will greatly enhance your ability to make changes. With this trust, you can accurately position your brand and products effectively.

What should I do about bad online reviews?

My approach is to address them ASAP, always be short, to the point, apologetic and offer some remittance. Never engage the review with a long conversation with explanations and finger pointing. Remember, you are speaking for the company and what you put online stays online forever.

 

Hard times appear to come in bundles, bad experiences can happen in a span of a week or two, bringing the appearance of bad quality.

Look at the amount of issues long term vs short term,
you may be achieving your quality goals.

Kevin Smith
Marketing Manager
Heritage Printing